Monday, April 26, 2010

Pueblo Horno

Back to the Acoma Pueblo: An horno (pronounced or-no) is the name of the outdoor ovens found in many Pueblos.  I snapped a picture of this one during our tour of Acoma.  Looks like it's well-used. To find out more about the history of hornos, to get a bread recipe, and find links to help you build your very own horno, click here!

13 comments:

  1. surprenant et beau four à pain. cela me rappelle celui dans mon village natal dans le lot, le four a pain de la ville (a l'époque du moyen age).

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  2. Interesting form, in the center of Mexico used a similar 'hornos' to cook an incredible dish call "Barbacoa" (Lamb). I can't say if this one had 200 years or 2.

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  3. I bet you can cook up some good eats in there!

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  4. I suspect once it gets warm it stays warm for a long time.

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  5. Very fascinating and great links!

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  6. Unusual photo. Love this type of find.

    Darryl and Ruth : )

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  7. I'd enjoy cooking in one of these

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  8. Boy, I bet it gets pretty warm in there, especially in the summer. Wouldn't want to get caught in one!

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  9. Neat! is there a story behind them? Old?

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  10. My grandmother baked bread in an horno as late as 1965. It was delicious. I imagine they built it in the 30s. Wouldn't you know that a guy who rented her old farmhouse backed into it with his pickup. End of the horno.

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  11. We call this a 'forno' and now I learned how to say it in spanish! :-) Quite similar though, as a lot of other words.

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  12. Its a very touchy subject for some (natives and mestizos) when newcomers take pictures of our ancestral lands.

    Please visit this link

    http://www.santafenewmexican.com/SantaFeNorthernNM/No-photos-please

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  13. Tsimajo, Thanks for including the link in your comment. When we visited Acoma, I paid the fee for using the camera when we entered and was instructed that we could not take photos inside the church or of the graveyard, which I and others respected. When I took photos of the people I asked first, and have since made hard copies and sent them to the people I photographed in Acoma. I understand and appreciate your concern. The only time I had a problem was on the Railrunner. I took a photo before the conductor asked us not to take pictures. When I asked the location of the boundaries, he was unable to answer the question.

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